Frequency Filters And Pick 3 Lottery and Pick 4 Lottery Games

If you are a Pick 3 lottery or Pick 4 lottery player, have you noticed how helpful your local State Lottery Official Websites have become by offering free information to help players find winning numbers? Some Official State Lottery sites are offering software capabilities to allow players find lucky lottery numbers to play. A recent web surfing adventure took me to the Official Delaware Lottery Website. This lottery website offers lottery players an ongoing updated frequency list of Pick 3 digits and Pick 4 digits that have been drawn. This frequency list is updated automatically after each drawing. The frequency filter based on the history of all drawn lottery numbers in each lottery game indicates to the players which of the ten digits – 0 to 9 – have been drawn the most times and the least times, and ranks all ten digits from most drawn to least drawn by actual number of drawings and the related percentages.

This frequency filter is used by Pick 3 systems and Pick 4 systems, particularly in software programs, to assist lottery players to produce the most effective list of potential numbers to play and win. By knowing that certain digits are drawn more than others lead to the belief that these more potent digits will increase one’s chances to win by playing these better performing digits. Mathematicians using the typical bell curve analysis suggest that in time all numbers, except in the case a technical bias created with a particular drawing system, should be drawn an equal amount of times. Generally, the overall number spread in random drawings is very small in the big picture of total draws. What is the real significance of the percentage of.003663 between the most drawn digit and the least drawn digit as in the case of the Delaware Play 3 game based on 186/50,778 drawings? It is similar to an 80 year old man saying to a 35 year old man, “In the history of mankind, we are about the same age.” The actual percentage by count is 10.1816% for the most drawn digit and 9.8153% for the least drawn digit.

Can a barely noticeable blip on the radar screen of positive numbers really make any real significance for the lottery player in choosing to play one digit over another? The Delaware Play 4 frequency chart wasn’t much different. It produced a.003246 difference between the most drawn digit and the least drawn digit out of a total number of 61,300 drawings. Based on this presented data found on the Official Delaware State Lottery website, are the resultant percentage differences of the digits significant enough to create a real choice for lottery players? Can frequency charts in general make any difference at all when using the total number of drawings from day one of the particular lottery game, either Pick 3 lottery or Pick 4 lottery, when the difference is reduced as low as three one thousandth of a percent of the total drawings?

Like looking for a needle in a haystack, splitting hairs as thin as these numbers suggest, choosing one digit over another, particularly in the middle range of the bell curve, makes it even more of an impossible task for even the most dedicated and committed lottery players who are willing to spend time in their research to find the next winning Pick 3 number or Pick 4 number to play.

Money for Nothing Much More Than About Lottery Tell-All

Money for Nothing: One Man’s Journey Through the Dark Side of Lottery Millions — an intriguing title for an intriguing book just out by Edward Ugel. So you like to gamble? Maybe just buy lottery tickets? Reading this non-fiction, astonishing book may be the best thing you’ve ever done for yourself. Ugel tells all in his story about his years as both a gambler, and a salesman, and then as an employee of a company that offered upfront cash to lottery winners in exchange for their prize money.

You’ve all seen the commercial for some company that offers cash that is due to you. All of the people cry out from wherever they are that it’s their money and they want it now. If that company, called The Firm, in this book, is one that caters only to lottery winners, however, there are oftentimes millions of dollars involved–and even though the winner may have won big, they may be as poor as ever!

One of the key issues is whether the particular lottery allows a lump sum as opposed to long-term payments. Selection of a lump sum has not always been available. Additionally, when you see the picture of the winner getting a large check with a large sum identified on it, the amount is always the amount before taxes!

Horror story after horror story for lottery winners are shared in this book–all names changed, of course.

Ugel has tried hard to write in an upbeat fashion in telling his story. His chapter titles are catchy. He ridicules some of his own actions and invites the reader to smile and commiserate with his choices. But he’s not really telling about a fun-filled life. The book, in my opinion, is very much an expose’ of this type of financial company, albeit though they are acting legally. Additionally, Ugel’s epilogue, written in a time schedule/diary fashion reveals exactly what the addicted gambler goes through each time he gives in to this vice.

Ugel has been a gambler since the age of 19, working at jobs to earn enough money so he could go gamble. When he was called to a bar by a friend, where a potential supervisor was drinking and smoking, Ugel thought he had finally found the place where he belonged. Indeed, while his boss was there at the The Firm with him, he quickly moved into big money and promotions, each time his boss moved up. But no matter how far up he went, he at last began to hate working with the man and quit, even though he was offered almost twice his present salary to stay. Ugel struggled through the following time, until he was called and asked to return. His former boss had quit and he was being offered his job. This had been what he had always wanted. He believed he could do the job and was soon back at The Firm.

Ugel did all right until his former boss opened his own business as a major competitor and quickly started winning potential customers away from The Firm. Ugel was finally relieved to be fired, for even though he was a super salesman, he realized that he had treated his job, and allowed his subordinates to also treat their jobs, as if each “lead” was merely a “gamble” and since there was always the potential for high commissions without working too hard, he realized that though being a better “gambler” than his former boss, he was not even close to being the kind of manager that his boss had been. As he said, “a gambler is a gambler is a gambler” (p. 212). He and his staff were quite willing to gamble both with their own money…and with the lottery winners’ money!

Many of us have our own addictions. If gambling is yours…read this book! If gambling is not your particular vice, read it…and insert your own predilection. For underneath the humor, Ugel has written a story that just may help you rethink what you are doing, to yourself, to your family, and on your job! Thank you, Edward Ugel, for sharing your life in such an open way and making us realize that Money for Nothing may be more trouble than anyone could imagine!